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The #1 Reason Some People Never Get A Cavity.

By Donald Bailey

Hint – it’s not better brushing and flossing.

I’m pretty sure you and I have both lived the exact same moment.

Remember the weird smell as the drill burred into your tooth, or the awkward position of your jaw as countless fingers and tools were jammed into your mouth? How about the moment when the dentist said rinse and spit, and all your fat lip and numb tongue could manage was to dribble wetness down the front of your chin?

As it turns out we’re not alone. Our dread, fear, frustration and disappointment at the pain and expense of another cavity is something 92% of adults experience.

So what makes the other 8% of adults different? Why have they never experienced the misery associated with a cavity?

The truth is they have a secret – one that I share with you below.

You Shouldn’t Blame Yourself for Cavities

We’ve all heard the key to avoiding cavities is to eat less sugar, do a better job brushing and flossing, and see the dentist every six months. Some of us have even tried to buy the best toothpaste and toothbrush we could find.

But before blaming yourself – your sweet tooth, your hurried brushing or your never flossing – remember that if your current toothpaste really worked, you wouldn’t have cavities.

The notion that better diet and hygiene can reduce your risk of getting cavities is only partially true, as I’ll explain below. And even if avoiding sugar and mastering the perfect toothbrush stroke worked, let’s be honest – these aren’t solutions that fit into our lives and habits.

The Real Reason We Get Cavities

The truth is cavities are caused by specific bacteria that spread easily within families and can last a lifetime. Once you understand where this bacteria lives, how it spreads and what it does, you’ll know how to actually solve your cavity problem rather than chasing the pipe dream of perfect hygiene.

I remember sitting in on my first scientific lecture at a dental convention in San Diego. I was at the World Congress of Minimally Invasive Dentistry and Dr. John Featherstone, now the Dean of Dentistry at UCSF, was explaining the role these nasty bacteria play in causing tooth decay. In short, they break down the food you eat into acid that dissolves your teeth.

Brush Better. Floss More. You’ve Heard That Before.

Dr. Featherstone’s proposed solutions to cavities didn’t involve teaching patients better brushing and flossing techniques. Instead, he focused on tools you and I could realistically use to defeat cavity-causing bacteria. Why?

Because even the best brushing and flossing techniques only temporarily remove bacteria from tooth surfaces. And when you reuse the same toothbrush as you did yesterday, what do you imagine is all over its handle and bristles?

What’s more, these cavity-causing, plaque-producing bacteria create homes where even the best tooth brushing and flossing can only dream about removing them. So instead of just sloshing them around with your toothbrush, you need a solution to get rid of these nasty germs and make sure they stay gone.

Here’s the Secret of the 8%

So here’s the secret of the 8% of adults who have never had a cavity – either they never caught this nasty bacteria or they have taken steps to eliminate it from their mouths.

Without this bacteria, their teeth thrive no matter how much sugar they eat, or how poorly they brush their teeth.

So why don’t dentists just give every patient an antibiotic or germ-killing mouthwash? Because we actually have lots of good bacteria that live in our mouths and we don’t want them gone. We need a solution that specifically targets cavity-causing bacteria.

Learn how to effortlessly destroy cavity-causing bacteria with little more than a spoonful of “sugar.”

  • Address the root cause of most tooth decay
  • Protect your teeth even if you have a less-than-perfect brushing habit
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  • Enjoy taking care of your teeth with our incredibly tasty and easy solution

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